China cracks down on app notifications

Bill Mount

China cracks down on app notifications Regulator proposes ‘people’s war’ to create a more orderly online environment A traveller checks her mobile phone at Wuhan Tianhe International Airport in China. (Reuters Photo) BEIJING: China’s internet watchdog says it will ban some mobile app notifications and tighten regulations as the government […]

China cracks down on app notifications

Regulator proposes ‘people’s war’ to create a more orderly online environment


A traveller checks her mobile phone at Wuhan Tianhe International Airport in China. (Reuters Photo)

BEIJING: China’s internet watchdog says it will ban some mobile app notifications and tighten regulations as the government ramps up a campaign to rein in the growing influence of internet companies over people’s daily lives.

The Cyberspace Administration of China (CAC) will strengthen guidance and control of mobile app information sources, and restrict notification volumes as part of a “people’s war” aimed at bringing order to the online environment, spokesperson Xie Dengke said on Saturday.

The CAC will ban media-related mobile apps from sending notifications from independent social media accounts operating in violation of regulations, and will filter what it sees as “harmful and undesirable information”, Xie said.

He did not name specific apps or social media accounts affected by the new rules.

The regulator will also work with financial regulators to “rectify” self-published financial accounts that have spread rumours, Xie said, to bring the dissemination of financial information under control.

China has in recent months sought to curb the economic and social power of its once loosely regulated internet giants, in a clampdown backed by President Xi Jinping.

Greater scrutiny and a strengthening of antitrust regulatory powers mirror an increasingly tough approach to the tech sector in the United States and Europe.

Following a “self-inspection” period to give mobile application operators an opportunity to address problems, the regulator will punish those not meeting certain requirements with penalties including fines and service suspensions, Xie said.

He did not say how long the self-inspection period would last.

Earlier this week, the internet watchdog found that 33 mobile phone apps broke data privacy rules by collecting data without consent, among other issues.

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