Best green apps – eco-friendly, sustainable apps

Bill Mount

Increasingly, many of us are seeking to lead more sustainable lives that take less of a toll on the environment. In our recent poll of readers, three quarters (73%) said they felt it was important to leave the world in a better state for the next generation and 70% said […]

Increasingly, many of us are seeking to lead more sustainable lives that take less of a toll on the environment. In our recent poll of readers, three quarters (73%) said they felt it was important to leave the world in a better state for the next generation and 70% said environmental issues are now too pressing to ignore.

Thanks to new technology like green apps, we’re not on our own in our drive to reduce our carbon footprints, minimise waste and track the progress we’re making in living in a more eco-friendly way.

Whether you want to avoid palm oil in products, tackle food waste or make a broader range of changes to your daily life, here are five free green apps which make it easier to live sustainably.

Giki

Launched in spring 2018 by the social enterprise of the same name, Giki is a green app that provides ethical information about more than 280,000 household products, from food and drink to cosmetics. Its 13 ‘badges’ rate how ethical, sustainable or healthy different products are.

Users scan a product’s barcode to get its ratings in each category. If the product scores poorly, alternatives are suggested. You decide which badges are the most important to you so you can make choices based on your personal environmental or ethical priorities.

Available on Apple here

Available on Android here

Oscar WongGetty Images

Too Good to Go

This fast-growing global platform has been going since 2016, tackling food waste by making surplus, unsold food from supermarkets, cafes and restaurants available to consumers at rock bottom prices.

Users browse participating venues by name, location and time of day, paying via the app for the food or meal chosen. There is an element of surprise as the food is packaged as a lucky dip ‘magic bag’, each of which saves an estimated 2.5kg of CO2 emissions. The app is already used in 15 countries by 32.7 million users, including 4.3 million in the UK.

Available on Apple here

Available on Android here

Kitche

Another food waste app but this one tackles food waste in the home by helping plan meals. Kitche (pronounced ‘kitsch’) allows users to scan supermarket receipts or upload online shopping receipts stored on their phones, so the app knows what food they have bought. It will then tap into its huge recipe bank to plan meals based on the food that’s in the fridge and kitchen cupboards. It also alerts you to items nearing their use-by dates.

The app is useful for managing household budgets as well as cutting down on food that would otherwise be thrown away.

Available on Apple here

Available on Android here

green apps

Oscar WongGetty Images

AWorld

This green app sets out to help consumers make small sustainable steps in their everyday lives and track the overall impact they have. It was set up by the United Nations to help individuals take action on climate change.

AWorld lets you log, for example, when you have taken a shorter shower, brought your own bag to a supermarket or turned off the lights when you leave a room. You can then view the impact you are making, including water, electricity and carbon emissions saved. The focus is on informative, interactive content and it’s encouraging seeing the progress you’re making.

Available on Apple here

Available on Android here

30 Wears

Our thirst for fast, ‘throwaway’ fashion comes with a huge environmental price tag. This app encourages shoppers to ask themselves before reaching the checkout: “Would I wear this 30 times?”

The idea is to avoid impulse buys and prioritise quality over quantity. By uploading to the app regular selfies of themselves wearing items they already own – styling them differently and tagging garments each time they are worn – users are encouraged to rediscover what is lurking in their wardrobe. Rest assured, it’s likely that the elasticated bottoms and hoodie you’ve worn through lockdown will pass the ’30 wears’ test!

Available on Apple here

Available on Android here

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