Build Android Apps With This $40 Master Class Developer Training

Bill Mount

How many times have you thought, “I could make this better” when you download and launch another smartphone app? Well, stop complaining and learn to make your own apps with The Complete Android 11 Developer Bundle. Now is a perfect time—with folks working remotely and spending more time at home—to […]

How many times have you thought, “I could make this better” when you download and launch another smartphone app? Well, stop complaining and learn to make your own apps with The Complete Android 11 Developer Bundle.

Now is a perfect time—with folks working remotely and spending more time at home—to learn the ins and outs of app development. Making apps isn’t just fun, it’s serious business. Through 11 courses and 38 hours of content, you’ll develop expertise in Java, Kotlin, and other essential Android tools. Each class presents a unique set of skills and hands-on experience.

No matter your coding skill level, you’ll learn something new in this bundle. It offers a beginner-friendly introduction to Kotlin, Android’s official programming language, and gets folks up to speed by personalizing an app using the layout editor in Java and Android Studio.

Additionally, you’ll get an introduction to Java—one of the most important languages in app development—learning the basics of variables, operators, loops, arrays, and object-oriented programming. You’ll also master how to craft modern user interfaces, explore different XML files, and even Firebase, a program that helps users create apps without writing the back-end code.

The Complete Android 11 Developer Bundle provides an inside track to an app developer career path that has an average salary of approximately $70,000 in the US. PCMag readers can snag the bundle now for $39.99—98% off the $2,200 MSRP.

Prices subject to change.

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